Thad Williamson, associate professor of leadership studies and philosophy, politics, economics and law, teaches courses such as Justice and Civil Society in the Jepson School of Leadership Studies.

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Many college students today feel themselves to be under immense pressure to secure their own professional futures – to be able to repay loans and to avoid falling on the wrong side of the deepening economic divide. Others want to acquire money and comfort, or power, because this is how a successful life has generally been portrayed to them. But many also have a concern with community and social problems and have experience doing various kinds of volunteer work; others are interested in politics and public service.

However, the ideas that getting serious about social change requires more than just volunteer work, and that democratic action is not simply about campaigns, elections, and the deeds of politicians, remain relatively novel to college students. As a college teacher, it is easy to get frustrated when confronted with students who are clueless, disengaged, or unwilling to see beyond the moneymaking definition of success. But in my experience many students are in fact eager for an alternative definition of a good life, and eager to learn more about social movements and social change. This is true whatever the self-described political leanings (if any) of students.

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Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law
Urban Politics and Sprawl
Community Economic Development
City of Richmond Politics
Sports, Justice, and Ethics