Expert Insights

University of Richmond faculty and staff are experts in their fields of study and chosen careers. Our experts have longstanding and ongoing research and expertise that adds perspective to the news of the day on a wide range of topics. The insights below include faculty-authored columns and research-based articles, as well as comments about headline news.

Recent Expert Insights


Monkeypox is now a national public health emergency in the U.S. - an epidemiologist explains what this means
Kathryn H. Jacobsen, an epidemiologist and professor of health studies, authored this piece.
August 5, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
ADHD in adults is challenging but highly treatable - a clinical psychologist explains
Psychology professor Laura Knouse authored this piece.
August 2, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Why declaring monkeypox a global health emergency is a preventative step - not a reason for panic
Kathryn H. Jacobsen, an epidemiologist and health studies professor, authored this piece.
July 29, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
The independent state legislature doctrine could reverse 200 years of progress and take power away from the people
Hank Chambers, professor of law, authored this piece.
July 18, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
When did the first fish live on Earth - and how do scientists figure out the timing?
Isaac Skromne, assistant professor of biology, authored this piece.
July 15, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Is monkeypox a pandemic? An epidemiologist explains why it isn't likely to become as widespread as COVID-19, but is worth watching
Health studies professor Kathryn H. Jacobsen authored this piece.
July 11, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
What do molecules look like?

A molecule is a group of atoms bonded together. Molecules make up nearly everything around you – your skin, your chair, even your food.

June 27, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
BBQ Science: The chemistry of cooking over an open flame

Chemistry professor Kristine Nolin explains what makes smoky, charred barbecue taste so good.

June 6, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Ukrainian refugees might not return, even long after the war ends
Political science professor Sandra Joireman explains why some people who are forcibly displaced choose not to return home.
June 2, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Supreme Court allows states to use unlawfully gerrymandered congressional maps in the 2022 midterm elections
Hank Chambers, professor of law, authored this piece.
May 13, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Biology with Tibetan Buddhist monks: What I'm taking back to my college classroom from teaching at a monastery
Dan Pierce, assistant professor of biology, authored this piece.
April 26, 2022
People of color have been missing in the disability rights movement - looking through history may help explain why

Jennifer Erkulwater, professor of political science, authored this piece.

 

April 4, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Maps show - and hide - key information about Ukraine war
Timothy Barney, chair of the Department of Rhetoric and Communication Studies, authored this piece.
March 30, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
I no longer grade my students' work - and I wish I had stopped sooner
English professor Libby Gruner authored this piece.
March 9, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Supreme Court inches towards deciding whether state legislatures can draw congressional districts largely free of court oversight
Hank Chambers, professor of law, authored this piece.
March 5, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Sharing top-secret intelligence with the public is unusual - but helped the US rally the world against Russian aggression
The Conversation U.S. asked international relations scholar Stephen Long at the University of Richmond to analyze why the U.S. government made the choice to do this and what effect it had.
February 11, 2022
THE CONVERSATION
Supreme Court's ruling on Alabama voting map could open the door to a new Wild West of state redistricting

Hank Chambers, professor of law, authored this piece.

February 7, 2022
The Conversation
What's the difference between sugar, other natural sweeteners and artificial sweeteners? A food chemist explains sweet science
Chemistry professor Kristine Nolin, a food scientist, explores the science of sugar.
January 21, 2022
The Conversation
Online tools put will-writing in reach for most people - but they're not the end of the line for producing a legally binding document
Law professor Allison Tait, a trust and estate expert, authored this piece about physical and digital will writing.
January 1, 2022
The Conversation
Resolutions that stick
Health psychology professor Camilla Nonterah explains what successful New Year's resolutions have in common.

 

November 19, 2021
The Conversation
Why do frozen turkeys explode when deep-fried?
Just in time for Thanksgiving, chemistry professor Kristine Nolin explains the science behind the dangers of putting even a partially frozen turkey in a deep-fryer.