Hundreds of people enter Queally Hall, the 37,000 square-foot addition to the Robins School of Business given by Paul and Anne Marie Queally, both 1986 graduates, everyday through the iconic Robbins Tower that connects the original business school building to the new wing.
History and Contributions
The namesake and history behind this majestic 74-foot structure funded by Robert “Bob” Jepson B’64, GB ’75 & H’87 started in 1959 when Dean W. David Robbins arrived at the business school at the ripe age of 37.  This was 10 years after the School of Business Administration (SBA) was established at the University of Richmond.
Dean Robbins left many imprints on the business school in his 18-year term of leadership.  One of his first endeavors as Dean was to raise $600,000 to fund construction of a permanent home for the business school which was previously housed in World War II barracks near the University’s heating plant.  Robbins raised enough money in his first year as Dean, and construction for the building began in 1961. 
Another landmark contribution pioneered by Dean Robbins was the accreditation of the Robins School of Business by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) in 1965.  That year, the Robins School was one of only four accepted applicants out of a pool of 22 schools that applied for accreditation. That same year, Beta Gamma Sigma, a business honors fraternity, was also established on campus under Dean Robbins’ leadership.
In 1974, the Robins School celebrated its 25th-year anniversary and enrolled a record number of women in the following fall.
Family Perspectives
While at the University, Dean Robbins’ daughter, Gay Robbins D’Surney, B’81 and accounting major, experienced the impact her father made on the business school and its students.  D’Surney reflects on her time in the Robins School and her father’s accomplishments.
In your words, what were Dean Robbins’ priorities and initiatives during his term of leadership?
Recruiting excellent faculty and getting the business school accredited.  I remember him coming home and saying that the accreditation was going to happen.  He was very pleased that the school would be on the map and able to attract great students and faculty members.  He dedicated his life to the education of bright young minds in hopes that they would carry the success into all areas of their lives.  
It has been written that there was a tradition of students playing pranks on Dean Robbins each April 1st for many years.  What was the funniest prank played on him?
Well, one time, I remember [the students] bricked up his office door, so he couldn't get in.  They also disassembled a compact car, and reassembled it in the Business School lobby.  He couldn't believe it.  
What was the best piece of advice or greatest thing you learned from your father?
‘If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing well,’ which I repeat to my son all of the time.
What do you think Dean Robbins would say if he could see the Robbins Tower or speak at the Robbins Dedication ceremony?
I think he would applaud his students. He wanted to give them an excellent foundation to compete in a changing business world.  He gave them credit for valuing their education.  He never expected anyone to give him credit.
Legacy and Ceremony
A grateful student stepped forward in 1986 to recognize the remarkable influence Dean Robbins had had on him.  Bob Jepson donated funds to establish the W. David Robbins Chair in Business Policy.   Dean Robbins was the first to hold the Chair and was named Distinguished University Professor of Business Policy upon his appointment.
On Friday, April 22 at 3:30 p.m. a ceremony will be held to dedicate the Robbins Tower.  Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to attend and pay tribute to the legacy of Dean W. David Robbins.

Hundreds of people enter Queally Hall, the 37,000 square-foot addition to the Robins School of Business given by Paul and Anne Marie Queally, both 1986 graduates, everyday through the iconic Robbins Tower that connects the original business school building to the new wing.

History and Contributions

The namesake and history behind this majestic 74-foot structure funded by Robert “Bob” Jepson B’64, GB ’75 & H’87 started in 1959 when Dean W. David Robbins arrived at the business school at the ripe age of 37.  This was 10 years after the School of Business Administration (SBA) was established at the University of Richmond.

Dean Robbins left many imprints on the business school in his 18-year term of leadership.  One of his first endeavors as Dean was to raise $600,000 to fund construction of a permanent home for the business school which was previously housed in World War II barracks near the University’s heating plant.  Robbins raised enough money in his first year as Dean, and construction for the building began in 1961. 

Another landmark contribution pioneered by Dean Robbins was the accreditation of the Robins School of Business by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) in 1965.  That year, the Robins School was one of only four accepted applicants out of a pool of 22 schools that applied for accreditation. That same year, Beta Gamma Sigma, a business honors fraternity, was also established on campus under Dean Robbins’ leadership.

In 1974, the Robins School celebrated its 25th-year anniversary and enrolled a record number of women in the following fall.

Family Perspectives

While at the University, Dean Robbins’ daughter, Gay Robbins D’Surney, B’81 and accounting major, experienced the impact her father made on the business school and its students.  D’Surney reflects on her time in the Robins School and her father’s accomplishments.

In your words, what were Dean Robbins’ priorities and initiatives during his term of leadership?
Recruiting excellent faculty and getting the business school accredited.  I remember him coming home and saying that the accreditation was going to happen.  He was very pleased that the school would be on the map and able to attract great students and faculty members.  He dedicated his life to the education of bright young minds in hopes that they would carry the success into all areas of their lives.  

It has been written that there was a tradition of students playing pranks on Dean Robbins each April 1st for many years.  What was the funniest prank played on him?
Well, one time, I remember [the students] bricked up his office door, so he couldn't get in.  They also disassembled a compact car, and reassembled it in the Business School lobby.  He couldn't believe it.  

What was the best piece of advice or greatest thing you learned from your father?
‘If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing well,’ which I repeat to my son all of the time.

What do you think Dean Robbins would say if he could see the Robbins Tower or speak at the Robbins Dedication ceremony?
I think he would applaud his students. He wanted to give them an excellent foundation to compete in a changing business world.  He gave them credit for valuing their education.  He never expected anyone to give him credit.

Legacy and Ceremony

A grateful student stepped forward in 1986 to recognize the remarkable influence Dean Robbins had had on him.  Bob Jepson donated funds to establish the W. David Robbins Chair in Business Policy.   Dean Robbins was the first to hold the Chair and was named Distinguished University Professor of Business Policy upon his appointment.

On Friday, April 22 at 3:30 p.m. a ceremony will be held to dedicate the Robbins Tower.  Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to attend and pay tribute to the legacy of Dean W. David Robbins.