Thad Williamson, associate professor of leadership studies and philosophy, politics, economics, and law (PPEL), writes about Nelson Mandela and economic justice.

---

Nelson Mandela was the pivotal, indispensable architect of one of the greatest political miracles of the 20th century, the abolition of apartheid in South Africa and the establishment of a multiracial democracy, achieved through tough negotiation rather than the catastrophic civil war that many observers had predicted.

Yet the second half of the revolution he sought for South Africa — freedom from poverty, establishment of genuine equality of opportunity and a fair share of national wealth — has yet to be achieved. Poverty was a central theme of Mandela’s famous 1964 speech at the Rivonia trial, in which 10 African National Congress leaders were prosecuted for sabotage, just as poverty was a central theme of the 1955 Freedom Charter, which articulated the ANC’s ambitions for a democratic society.

Full article

Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law
Urban Politics and Sprawl
Community Economic Development
City of Richmond Politics
Sports, Justice, and Ethics