A student-curated bilingual exhibition depicting the graphic novel “Darkroom: A Memoir in Black & White” is now on view in the Carole Weinstein International Center Gallery. Using 22 of the original drawings in the book by Lila Quintero Weaver, the free exhibition explores a variety of topics such as cultural integration and race relations. It is open to the public through September 1.

“Darkroom” explores issues of immigration and civil rights in the 1960s based on the author’s personal experiences growing up in Alabama after moving from Argentina. Hand-drawn, black and white pictures are included throughout the book.

Students in a Spanish writing workshop class read and analyzed both the literary and visual aspects of the book. They developed an exhibition using original drawings sent by the author. The drawings are presented with descriptions and students’ reflections in both English and Spanish.

“Having to curate a bilingual exhibition gave the students the opportunity to dissect the text and at the same time infuse their reflections with creativity by having to work from different perspectives themselves,” said Karina Vazquez, director of the Spanish community-based learning program.

This exhibit is sponsored by the Department of Latin American, Latino and Iberian Studies, the Spanish community-based living learning program, the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement, the School of Arts and Sciences, the Office of International Education, the Office of Multicultural Affairs and the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies program.

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Creative Reflection

“Having to curate a bilingual exhibition gave the students the opportunity to dissect the text and at the same time infuse their reflections with creativity by having to work from different perspectives themselves.”

-Karina Vazquez, director of the Spanish community-based learning program.

Director of Community-Based Learning
Intersections between Literary and Social Studies
Latin American XX/XXI Centuries Narrative
Experiential Learning
Visual Studies and Literary Theory