UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND — October is here and as the home of the Spiders there is no lack of expertise "crawling" around campus for insight into the Halloween season. From candy taxes to zombie mania, our team has developed a list of experts who are available for all your Halloween stories this month.

Featured experts include: 

Hayes Holderness on candy tax
Holderness, assistant professor of law and a tax expert, can discuss why certain types of candy is taxed while others are not.

Jennifer O'Donnell on spiders
As a biology professor and animal care expert, O'Donnell cares for and studies a variety of tarantulas, including Tarrant, the Spider men's basketball team's live mascot.

Elizabeth Outka on zombies
Outka, an associate professor of English, investigates the connection between historic plagues and today's zombie craze.

A full list of experts are highlighted on this Halloween expert guide

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Professor of Psychology
Social Psychology
Personality Psychology
Research Methods
Heroes, Great Leaders, Legends, and Martyrs
Professor of Finance
Joseph A. Jennings Chair in Business
Corporate Finance
Derivative Securities
Econometrics
Finance Pedagogy
Initial Public Offerings
Practitioner Issues
Securities and Exchange Commission
Small Business Management
Associate Professor of Classics and Archaeology; Affiliated Faculty, Art & Art History
Archaic Greek Art and Poetry
Anatolian Archaeology
Achaemenid Art
Funerary Monuments and Traditions
Associate Director, Employer Relations
Areas of Focus: Arts, Communication, Entrepreneurship, Healthcare, Marketing, Science, Technology
Assistant Professor of Law
Tax Law
State and Local Taxation
Manager of Biological Laboratories
Immunology and Human Biology
Animal Care
Tarrant the Tarantula
Associate Professor of English
Modernism
Twentieth-century British and Irish literature and culture
History of the novel
Associate Professor of Theatre
Costume Design
Makeup Design
Costume Construction
Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies
Chair, Department of Religious Studies
Religion in early America
Native American religions
Religion and popular/material culture